GM Renaissance Center

Conceived by Henry Ford II and financed primarily by the Ford Motor Company, the Renaissance Center became the world’s largest private development with an anticipated 1971 cost of $500 million. In part, civic leaders intended this ambitious urban renewal project...

Ford / UAW Building

The first building associated with the Civic Center plan features an eagle relief sculpture by Marshall Fredericks.  The building was renovated in...

Ford Building

When it was built in 1909, the Ford Building was the tallest skyscraper in Detroit until 1913.  Unlike Burnham’s previous buildings, it was constructed with a steel frame instead of thick masonry.  The exterior was clad in white terra cotta that was crisply detailed...

Old Mariner’s Church

The oldest surviving stone church in Detroit originally stood at the end of Woodward Avenue, but it was moved in 1955 as part of the Civic Center (Hart Plaza)...

Guardian Building

The Guardian Building, a National Historic Landmark, is a skyscraper in downtown Detroit, Michigan. Built in 1928 and finished in 1929, the building (originally called the Union Trust Building) is a bold example of Art Deco architecture, including some art moderne...

Dime Building

Originally known as the Dime Savings Bank Building, this building is one of three remaining buildings designed by one the most celebrated architects at the...

David Stott Building

Located at the corner of Griswold and State Street, this building incorporates brick, marble (on the first three floors from the street), and limestone as its surface materials. As with many of the other Detroit buildings of the era it contains architectural sculpture...

David Broderick Tower

When originally built, it was referred to as the Eaton Tower and was the 2nd tallest building in Michigan at the time.  The classical style tower was once topped with Beaux-Arts details, most of which have now disappeared.  The building features relative small floor...

Majestic Building

When completed in 1896, the Majestic Building was the tallest building in Detroit until 1909 when the Ford Building was completed.  The building featured terra cotta inside and out.  The Majestic was demolished in 1962 to make way for the First Federal Building, also...

Park Avenue House

The Park Avenue House (formerly called the Royal Palms Hotel) is one of three hotels that Louis Kamper designed for what was once the heart of Detroit’s hotel district.  Kamper also designed the Eddystone Hotel and the Park Avenue Hotel.  The Park Avenue House is 13...

Sheraton Detroit Riverside Hotel

Formerly known as the Pontchartrain Hotel, this building sits on the site occupied by the first permanent French settlement in Detroit, Fort Pontchartrain. Uniquely shaped, each faceted face offers views of both the river and the city from each room. The hotel was...

David Whitney Building

Originally, the building was adorned with Italian Renaissance details, much of which were removed when the building was renovated in 1959.  It was originally built as an office tower for doctors and dentists, who after World War II began to locate near hospitals.  The...

One Woodward Avenue

Formerly known as the Michigan Consolidated Gas Company, this modern building draws upon similar work by Mies van der Rohe who also influenced 211 West Fort Street. The lightness of the structure is emphasized by the three-story lobby. One Woodward Detroit is known...

Detroit Athletic Club

Albert Kahn was influenced by Rome’s Palazzo Farnese and other Renaissance works he discovered during his 1912 tour of Italy when he designed this dignified structure for Detroit’s auto...

Westin Book Cadillac

At one time, this Louis Kamper masterpiece was the tallest building in Detroit and the tallest hotel in the world.  The hotel changed hands many times since the Great Depression and finally ended up closed and abandoned.   Local developers stepped up in 2005 to...

Comerica Tower

Formerly known as the One Detroit Center, the Comerica Tower was the last great skyscraper built in Detroit. While some have branded it postmodern, it is more appropriately identified as historicist with gothic inspired detailing and extensive use of granite.  Almost...

Coleman A. Young Municipal Center

Formerly known as the City County Building, it was renamed after the death of the former Detroit Mayor. As a composition, it is very similar to the United Nations Headquarters in New York. The center is comprised of an administration tower, the low 14-story building,...

Buhl Building

The Buhl Building was Detroit’s first skyscraper and was the first of many prominent buildings designed by Wirt Rowland during his tenure at Smith, Hinchman & Grylls.  The architectural sculpture on the building was designed by Corrado Parducci.

Book Tower

The 38-story Book Tower was part of the Washington Boulevard redevelopment, a project by J. Burgess Book, Jr. and his brothers which transformed a run-down area of Detroit into one of the world’s most fashionable streets. Planned in 1915 by Edward H. Bennett of...

Chase Tower

Like most bank buildings, the currently named Chase Tower has also been known as the The National Bank of Detroit and Bank One Building. The building occupies to former site of the oddly shaped ten-story Hammond Building, which was the first skyscraper in Detroit to...

211 West Fort Street

This Detroit skyscraper is a fairly typical example of the International Style that was made popular at the time by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building in New York City (1958). 211 West Fort Street exhibits the same rigorous rhythm of exterior windows and...

150 West Jefferson

150 West Jefferson, formerly known as the Madden Building, sits on the former site of the Detroit Stock Exchange. Some of the facade of the old building was preserved and was used in the interior and exterior decoration of this building.   It was the first tower to...

1001 Woodward Avenue

1001 Woodward, also known as First Federal Bank Building, is a mixed-use 25-story granite-clad skyscraper on the corner of Michigan and Woodward Avenue anchoring the Campus Martius District. The building was renovated starting in 1998 to support Class “A”...

Ford Auditorium

Built as the new home for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, the Ford Auditorium was placed according to Saarinen’s original Civic Center plan.  This very simple structure did little to disguise its primary function. Poor acoustics eventually led to the return of the DSO...

Rosa Parks Transit Center

Since the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation (DEGC) first announced this project in 2005, little visible progress was made on this project. However, in February 2007, the DEGC announced that a construction contract was awarded for the terminal. Construction will...